Quickie Xenon Manual Wheelchair


Wheelchair Name: 
Quickie Xenon Wheelchair

Tell us what your wheelchair looks like: 
Pink lightweight folding frame, with quick release self propelled wheels and Frogs Legs forks and caster wheels. Mid-range back rest, removeable seat cushion and a folding footplate. Additional back support and handles that can easily be pushed by a carer.

How did you get this wheelchair: 
Paid for it myself

Where did you get this wheelchair:
Sunrise Medical & Alton Aids

What would you rate this wheelchair: 

★★★★★

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This wheelchair is really comfortable?
Strongly Agree

This wheelchair is easy to take apart?
Agree

This wheelchair is easy to transport?
Strongly Agree

This wheelchair is easy to use on public transport?
Strongly Agree

This wheelchair is great off road?
Disagree

This wheelchair can go up or down a kerb/small step?
Agree

This wheelchair can easily be adapted?
Strongly Agree 

Can you hang bags and equipment onto the wheelchair?
Yes

Do you have problems with the wheelchair tipping?
Only when loaded with too much baggage.

 

Personal Opinion:

My wheelchair is a Quickie Xenon, which has been customized to suit my needs and lifestyle. Weighing in at just under 11kg, this wheelchair is really easy to transport, lift and fold. This wheelchair has a very smart design with an innovative cross brace that sits neatly under the seat, meaning you barely notice the folding mechanism. All of which are features you would typically only see on a rigid wheelchair. Due to the nature of my condition and my main caregivers’ limitations I needed a wheelchair that could support my lower back, whilst still being light enough to fold and lift and this wheelchair did just that! The folding wheelchair system is really easy to operate and can be opened with one hand, by simply pressing a lever. Then to fold the wheelchair back up you just remove the seat cushion and pull the seat base upwards until you hear the locking mechanism click into place. The locking mechanism keeps the chair in a folded position, where you can then remove the quick release wheels to make the wheelchair even lighter to transport. Typically, I keep the wheels on, but this option has come in handy when travelling in a smaller car/taxi! I was given the option to make this chair even lighter by using carbon fiber for the footplate, side panels etc. However, due to the fact I travel a lot and have seen first-hand how badly wheelchairs are handled when travelling on an airplane, I was advised to make the frame slightly stronger to minimize any damage!

After having no luck with getting a suitable wheelchair from the NHS Wheelchair Services, I spent a lot of time researching manual wheelchairs online. As much as I despised using a wheelchair at the time, I knew I couldn’t put it off any longer and spend the rest of my life in my house! I was overwhelmed by the endless options, but I finally decided that I liked the look of the Quickie Xenon. To get more information on this wheelchair, I went onto Sunrise Medical and requested a call back. The next day someone from the company got in touch to chat about my needs, the intended purpose and whether or not they thought this wheelchair was right for me. They also answered any questions I had and provided me with more information, such as cost and where I could go to try out a Quickie Xenon. Much to my surprise there is a mobility equipment supplier called Alton Aids very close to my home, which had a huge variety of devices in store for me to see. I was able to try out the wheelchair to see if I liked it, if I felt comfortable in it and if I could safely maneuver myself. My carer also tried pushing me around to get a feel for the wheelchair. We then checked if the wheelchair fit in my car and that my carer could safely get it in and out on my behalf. I did try out a few other wheelchairs, but for me the Xenon came out on top. We then spent some time working out the measurements for my wheelchair and discussing the endless options I had in terms of seat cushions, back rests, footplates, side supports etc. This was something that was very important to me as I needed a frame that perfectly fits my body whilst also meeting my needs. I have a Matrix, Flo-Tech Lite seat cushion and my back rest covers two thirds of my spine. Although the backrest is adjustable in height and angle, both of which are easy to alter and something I frequently tweak depending on my pain. I also opted to have a bar going across the back of my wheelchair, making my backrest more rigid and supportive. The bar simply unclicks and neatly hangs alongside the frame when folded. I have recently put a Clip Buddy, by Dream Baby onto this bar, which was originally designed to go on a child’s stroller. This carabiner style clip has come in very handy when I’ve had lots of shopping, as you can simply clip a bag onto it and it neatly hangs out of the way. The handlebars I opted to get put on my wheelchair are quite small and neat, but there were a LOT of options! My carer has no problems pushing my wheelchair with these handlebars and finds the rubber grips on them very useful. I can also hang my backpack onto the handlebars and it doesn’t get in the way when someone is pushing me. I opted for no sidebars so I could comfortably self-propel a short distance, but I typically depend on a carer to push me. Not only does this option mean I can independently maneuver my wheelchair, which is very handy in restaurants/theatres etc., but it also encourages me to sit up straight as opposed to slouching and leaning on one of the side bars.

I initially had the Carbotecture Forks attached to my front caster wheels, however I quickly swapped them to Frogs Legs. These suspension forks provide me with a lot more comfort as they absorb some of the vibrations and shocks that naturally occur when sitting in a wheelchair. Without these forks and caster wheels I could only sit in my wheelchair for a short period of time as my pain levels would quickly rise. In addition to the Frogs Legs, I opted for the 12 spoke Spinergy Wheels as I think they have a sleek appearance in comparison to the 18 spoke version. I also have one anti-tip bar attached to my wheelchair to increase stability and lower my chances of tipping over backwards. On the other side I opted for slightly different tipper that allows my carer to safely tip my chair when going up or down a small step/curb.

I chose a bright pink frame, which was something I was adamant about from the beginning of my search for the perfect wheelchair. The various colour options available for the Quickie Xenon were a big selling point for me. I was bored of having a standard black wheelchair that didn’t meet my needs or fit my personality. Now I not only feel physically comfortable in my wheelchair, but I genuinely love being in something that I have designed and accessorized. In addition to the pink frame, I have decorated my wheels with the JML Wheelie Bright Lights that not only add to my pink theme but are a big help when out in the dark. I travel quite a lot a frequently visit Disneyland, so when navigating a dark crowded area, the lights help you stand out and prevent people from walking into you/falling over you. Finally, I have cable-tied some craft flowers to the inner circle of my wheels, which I absolutely love! One of the main driving forces behind my pink theme was the stares and raised eyebrows that came with being in a wheelchair, especially for someone who doesn’t ‘look disabled’. I now have people stopping me to compliment my wheelchair instead of staring or making rude comments, which has massively boosted my confidence. It has also played a huge part in me accepting my condition and being proud of my wheelchair!

I would highly recommend this wheelchair to anyone who frequently travels or uses a car with limited space. It is also fantastic for people who have a disability/medical condition that can fluctuate in symptoms, because you can easily change the backrest height/angle, footplate height/angle and much more with an allen key. These small adjustments make a really big difference and I have been known to do these in the most bizarre of places, including Brooklyn Bridge in NYC and a boat in the middle of a lake in Florida!

Reviewer: Lauren
Disability or Medical Condition: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

CLICK HERE to read another review written by Lauren on a Quickie Helium (Manual Wheelchair)


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